1990s


Arizona Flash

ca. 1990-ca. 2014

Al Arriaga built a jet dragster in about 1990, using a Westinghouse J-34 engine. It may have been the old George Hedebeck/Jerry Segal "Lone Star Lightning" dragster. He campaigned it a lot in Mexico. Beginning in 1993, Scott Arriaga did the driving. 268 mph known top speed.  Click here to see video footage.


Chicago Rush

1990

Dan Sullivan employed a Pratt & Whitney J-60 engine in an '89 Corvette body in his jet funny car. He engaged Chuck Scheer to do the driving. 222 mph known top speed. Sullivan opted to go to a jet dragster by at least 1993, also going with the "Chicago Rush" name.


Hawaiian Punch

1990-92

Pat Davidson, of Milford, Massachusetts, campaigned a '90 T-Bird jet funny car powered by a General Electric J-85 engine. Dick Rosberg drove it on occasion.


Northern Force/Rock 'n' Roll Thunder

1990-2008

Marc Rowe built a jet funny car for Bob Elliott, of Londesborough, Ontario, Canada. He mounted a General Electric J-85 engine in a 1990 Chevrolet Beretta. Elliott clocked 278 mph before selling it to the Dustman Brothers, of Malvern, Ohio, in late 1991. Jim Dustman did the driving. He was the first jet funny car driver to go over 280 mph--he did it in this car in 1993 at Englishtown. They mounted a 1994 Chevy Lumina body on the chassis in 1994. They sold the funny car to Fran and Phil Peppler in 1996. Click here to see video footage.  Click here to see video footage of his car taken at the 1995 Pro Jet Car Nationals at Atco; begins at the 4:52 minute mark of the video.  Click here to see more TV coverage of the Dustman Brothers' jet funny car at the 1995 Pro Jet Car Nationals at Atco.


Hooters

1991-2002

Fred Sibley, Jr., of Bradenton, Florida., obtained sponsorship from the Hooters restaurant chain for his "88 Ford Tempo jet funny car. It was powered by a J-34 Westinghouse engine. In 1998, he switched to a 1998 Camaro body. 274 mph known top speed. Click here to see video footage taken at Atco in 1992.


Cardiac Arrest

1991-96

Hedebeck and Segal built a 1990 Corvette jet funny car powered by a Westinghouse J-34 engine for Bob Vance, of Riverside, California. Doug Brown did the driving. In 1996 it was bought by Yasuyoshi Nakajima in Japan.  254 mph known top speed. Click here to see TV footage of Brown racing the jet funny car in Japan; begins at the 6:14 minute mark of the video.


Thunder Down Under

1991-96

Gary Miocevich, of Quinn's Rock, Australia, campaigned an '83 Ford LTL 9000 jet truck powered by a General Electric J-79 engine. 202 mph known top speed. In 2015, Miocevich passed away. The Miocevich family began rebuilding the old jet truck and hoped to have it completed in late 2015 to once again run in exhibitions as a tribute to Gary.  Click here to see video footage of the jet truck at Willowbank Raceway in 1994.


Flashback

1991-96

Fill Smith, of Indianapolis, campaigned a General Electric J-85-5-powered jet dragster for several years. "I got the engine from Craig Arfons," said Smith. "It was one he salvaged from an old jet that had been taken out of commission." 303 mph known top speed.  Click here to see video footage of "Flashback" jet dragster at St. Thomas Dragway in 1991.


Super Mario

1991-2001

Mario Carranca, of Port Charlotte, Florida, campaigned a 1986 Camaro jet funny car powered by a Westinghouse J-34 engine. In 1996, he switched to a '96 Chevrolet Monte Carlo body. Click here to see video footage of his car taken at the 1995 Pro Jet Car Nationals at Atco; begins at the 4:27 minute mark of the video.  See more video footage of Mario Carranca at Atco in 1995.


TLC

1992

Roger Gustin fielded a 1991 Chevy Beretta jet funny car in mid-1992. Unfortunately, that was the year that Gustin crashed while drivina a new, unpainted jet funny car at Atco on August 29. He was severely injured. There were two TLC jet funny cars prepared by Gustin in 1992.  Click here to see video footage of his crash at Atco. He is in the unpainted jet funny car, which is not the TLC car.


Olympic Gardens/Lectralite/Truck Air Transfer

1992-2003

Jim Neilson, of Hollywood, Florida, campaigned a 30-foot 1992 Mercedes Benz jet stretch limousine powered by a Westinghouse J-34-36 engine. 267 mph known top speed. Click here to see video footage of the jet limo.


Pirelli Pro-Jet

1992-2007+

Steve Murty, of Hebden Bridge, England, drove an '81 Ford jet-engined truck. Click here to see a 2007 TV interview with Murty and video footage of his jet truck.


Gravity Storm

1993-ca. 2013 

Chuck Haynes, of Billings, Montana, campaigned a jet dragster powered by a Pratt & Whitney J-60 engine. Also driven by Gary Miocevich, Kevin Olsen, Curt White, and Andy Beauchemin. 291 mph known top speed. Click here to see video footage.


Under Pressure

1993-98

Pat Davidson, of Milford, Massachusetts, campaigned a '92 Chrysler LeBaron jet funny car powered by a General Electric J-85 engine. The Chrysler body was replaced with a '95 Chevrolet Beretta body by 1997. 280 mph known top speed. Davidson initially had George DiGregorio do the driving, but started driving himself in about 1995.  Click here to see video footage of "Under Pressure" racing George Schreiber's jet dragster at St. Thomas Dragway in 1993.


Damn Yankee III

1993-2006

Jim Lutz, of Chicago, built a jet dragster powered by a General Electric J-85 engine. It was driven by Bill Lutz.  Click here to see TV coverage of Lutz's jet dragster at the 1995 Pro Jet Car Nationals at Atco.  See even more TV coverage of Lutz's dragster at the 1995 Pro Jet Car Nationals.


WorkMat

1993-

Roger Gustin fielded two jet funny cars in 1993, a Camaro and a Chevy Beretta. Mike Evegens and Jerry Gannon (in Chevy Lumina in 1998 photo above), of West Palm Beach, were his drivers. Click here to see video footage of Gannon with the Camaro; go to 2:49 minute mark in the video.


WorkMat Pro

1993-98

Mike Evegens, of Atlanta, first drove this 1992 Camaro jet funny car for Roger Gustin's team. Then it was driven by Jerry Gannon, but by 1998, Mel Eaves was the driver. 281 mph known top speed.


Fireforce

1993-2001

Martin Hill, of Podington, England, raced a 1988 Ford Mustang jet funny car powered by a Pratt & Whitney J-60 engine in Europe for several years. In 2000, he replaced the body with a 1999 Chevy Lumina body. Click here to see video footage; begins at the 1:40 minute mark and ends at the 2:08 minute mark in the video.


Sonic Thunder III

1993-2001

Lou Sattelmaier, of Brunswick, Ohio, owned and drove a 1993 Ford Probe jet funny car powered by a Pratt & Whitney J-60 engine. 270 mph known top speed. Click here to see video footage of "Sonic Thunder III" at Kil-Kare Dragway in 1993.


Chicago Rush

ca. 1993-2018

After running a jet funny car, Dan Sullivan switched to jet dragsters. He had the Jet Shop in Garland, Texas, build his jet dragster, powered by a Pratt & Whitney JT-12 engine. He initially engaged Chuck Scheer to drive, but shortly assumed the driving duties himself. He continues to campaign the jet dragster after more than two decades. In 1997, he clocked 304 mph at Napierville Dragway in Canada. In 1998, he turned 308 mph at Dragway 42. Click here to see video footage taken at Great Lakes Dragway.  Click here to see TV coverage of Sullivan's "Chicago Rush" jet dragster at Atco at the 1995 Pro Jet Car Nationals.


Runnin' Scared/Dyn-O-Mat Warrior

1993-99

Bob Van Sciver, who owned Atco Raceway, first used a 1993 Ford Thunderbird body in his jet funny car. It was powered by a General Electric J-85 engine. In 1994, he switched to a '94 T-Bird body and in 1997 to a '97 T-Bird body. 268 mph known top speed.  Click here to see video footage of his car taken at the 1995 Pro Jet Car Nationals at Atco; begins at the 3:23 minute mark of the video.  See more TV coverage of Van Sciver at the 1995 Pro Jet Car Nationals at Atco.


Dastardly Don

1994

Don Marsh, of Webster, Massachusetts, had only recently bought a 1993 Pontiac Trans Am jet funny car. It was powered by a Pratt & Whitney J-60 engine. He was killed on August 13, 1994, during an exhibition run at Virginia Motorsports Park.


Super Sonic

1994-2001

Bob Sattelmaier, of Brunswick, Ohio, campaigned a 1994 Dodge Daytona powered by a Westinghouse J-34 engine. 264 mph known top speed.


Final Countdown

ca. 1994-96?

Dr. Rick Brophy, a chiropractor from Oakley, California, purchased a Hedebeck and Segal-built jet dragster powered by a Westinghouse J-34 turbofan engine. This may be the jet dragster formerly owned by Joe Gonzalez called "Rocky Mountain Express" in 1984. 285 mph known top speed.


Arizona Outlaw

ca. 1994-ca. 2003

Joe Brown, of Eagar, Arizona, campaigned a 1994 Corvette jet funny car powered by a Westinghouse J-34 engine. At least by 2001, Brown had switched the Corvette body for a '57 Chevy. 236 mph known top speed.

Hawaiian Eagle

1994-96

Tom and Nalani Seydel campaigned a jet dragster before building their ever-popular fire engine jet car.


Super Shock Wave

1994-ca. 2017+

Les Shockley mounted two Pratt & Whitney J-34-48 engines in a 1957 Chevy pickup. Ken High was Shockley's designated driver. "After a while, you get used to how things look as they go by," said Shockley. "It's just like when you're driving around in your car--you start to lean back and relax. Except if you put your arm out the window, you'll rip it off." Scott Shockley began driving it in about 2005. It turned 334 mph from a standing start in a half-mile drag. Click here to see video footage of it in 2011 at Rocky Mountain Raceway in Salt Lake City.


Pennzoil Warrior

1995

Dick Rosberg, from Rockingham, North Carolina, drove a 1995 Ford Mustang jet funny car owned by Bob Van Sciver. In March 1995, he crashed at Englishtown, when the car had a Beretta body. The Beretta body was replaced with the Mustang body to race at the Pro Jet Car Nationals at Atco later in 1995. In 1996, Rosberg moved from racing jet funny cars to jet dragsters.  Click here to see an interview with Rosberg and video footage of his car taken at the 1995 Pro Jet Car Nationals at Atco; begins at the 0:15 minute mark of the video.  See more TV coverage of Rosberg at the 1995 Pro Jet Car Nationals at Atco.


Running Hot

1995

Chuck Scheer, of Rockford, Illinois, suffered a broken leg when his parachute failed to deploy on his jet dragster at Englishtown on July 12, 1995. His dragster was powered by a Pratt & Whitney J-60 engine.


Western Flame/Inferno

1995-2018+

Bruce Abbott, of Parker, Colorado, put a Pratt & Whitney J-60 engine in a '95 Chevy S-10 pickup. In 1999, he changed the name to "Inferno" and replaced the body with a replica of a '98 Chevy extended-cab pickup. Inferno was powered by an Allison J-33 engine. 265 mph known top speed. Click here to see video footage taken at Los Angeles County Raceway in 2007.


Wipe Out

ca. 1995

Shon Wolfe, Roger Pontbriand, and Larry Parks designed and built a jet truck powered by a Pratt & Whitney J-57 engine. 167 mph known best speed for a quarter mile, but 420 mph in a half-mile distance on an airport runway. Click here to see video footage of the truck driven by Shon Wolfe at Firebird International Raceway.


First Strike

1995-2017

Al Hanna, of Enfield, Connecticut, built a 1996 Pontiac Firebird powered by a General Electric J-85 engine. Al's son, Rich Hanna, drove the car. Rich became the first jet funny car driver to go over 290 mph, accomplished in 1996. Later he switched to a 2007 Firebird body. Click here to see video footage of the jet funny car at the 1995 Pro Jet Car Nationals at Atco; begins at the 4:37 minute mark of the video.  Click here to see more video footage at the 1995 Pro Jet Nationals at Atco.


Texas Jet Set

1995-ca. 2002

Ancel Horton, of Azle, Texas, campaigned a jet dragster powered by a Pratt & Whitney engine. He sold the jet dragster to Jim Medley in 1998 and began driving the "Mississippi Madman" jet dragster owned by Greg King. Medley, of Joppa, Maryland, continued on with the "Texas Jet Set" car through at least 2001, if not beyond.


Secret Weapon

1995-ca. 2015

Bob Vance, of Rialto, California, campaigned a M60 tank jet dragster powered by a Westinghouse J-34 engine. He engaged Jerry Segal to be his driver initially, but Vance took over the driving duties by the end of 1995. Joe Brown, of Queen Creek, Arizona, drove it by at least 2003, Brad Janishewski was the owner by at least 2013, with Tim Boychuck handling driving duties. Click here to see video footage in 2013.


Earthquake II

1996-ca. 2001

Bob Howard, of Ralston, Nebraska, campaigned a 1995 Kenworth semi-truck powered by a General Electric J-79 engine.


Thunder Struck

1996-97

In 1996, Joe Rammel from Michigan, drove a jet dragster by this name that was purportedly built in 1983. It was powered two jet engines. It is not known who the owners were prior to this. It was scheduled to appear at Norwalk Raceway Park on April 27 and at Cordova Raceway on June 8-9, 1966.


Green Monster Jet Quad

1996-2001

"Turbo Tim" Arfons, of Akron, Ohio, was the nephew of Art Arfons. His ATV was powered by an all-chrome General Electric T-58-10 engine. 190 mph known top speed.


Jet Barstool

1997-99

"Turbo Tim" Arfons mounted an Allied Signal JFS-100 jet engine on a barstool. The frame was 41-30 chrome-moly steel. Why did he build it? "It was one of those things where I was trying to find the wildest thing to put a jet engine in," Arfons said. It had the potential to do 100 mph, but for safety reasons, Arfons only raced it at about 25 mph. 



Hawaiian Fire Dept.

ca. 1997-2019+

It took Tom Seydel three years to build a jet-engined 1940 fire truck, powered by two Rolls Royce Viper jet engines. Neal Darnell bought the fire truck to include in his fleet of three jet trucks in about 2013. He named it "Aftershock."  Click here to see video footage of the jet fire truck in 2006.


Cannonball Express

1997-2016

K. C. Jones, of Van Nuys, California, wrapped a locomotive-type body around a Westinghouse jet engine. It was replete with a smoke stack, cow catcher, and train whistle. In 2007, Jones debuted a companion jet train called the "Chattanooga Choo Choo." Click here to see TV interview with Jones and footage of the jet dragster; go to the 0:35 second mark for the beginning of the interview.


Warped Speed

1997-2000

Darin Bay, of Banks, Oregon, built his first jet funny car, "Warped Speed," modeled on a 1998 Thunderbird body, and began touring the west coast with Richard Smith's "Pony Express" funny car. In 2000, he sold his original "Warped Speed" car and built the second in a series of four "Warped Speed" jet funny cars, employing Pontiac Firebird bodies.


Burning Desire

ca. 1997

Sammy Torsuna campaigned a jet funny car based on a glass '57 Chevy in Europe. He was burned in the jet funny car in 1997, but recovered to build and run a glass Studebaker jet funny car about a year later.  Click here to see video footage; begins at 3:17 minute mark and includes his disastrous fire in 1997.


Night Fire

1997-2003

Billy Bartkus and his partner, Al Zukauskas, from Park Ridge, Illinois, campaigned a jet dragster powered by a General Electric J-85 engine. The dragster was built by Wayne Knuth in about 1992. 303 mph known top speed.


Jolly Roger Express

1998

The Dustman brothers (Jack, Jim, and John), from Mantua, Ohio, built a jet dragster powered by a Pratt & Whitney J-60 engine. Jim Dustman and Ernie Bogue were the drivers. 303 mph known top speed.


Bob Caldwell Dodge Country

1998-2000

A Pratt & Whitney J-78 engine was fitted into a 1998 Dodge Ram pickup. Sponsored by an Ohio car dealer.


Mississippi Madman

1998-2003

Greg King owned a jet dragster powered by a Pratt & Whitney engine. He engaged Ancel Horton to drive it. 312 mph known top speed.


Backdraft

1998-2001

Kenny Piscopo, of Toms River, New Jersey, owned and drove a jet funny car prepared by Bob Jinkens. It was a 1998 Pontiac Firebird with a General Electric J-85 engine.


Dakota Thunder

1998-ca. 2013

Mike Pond, of Canon City, Colorado, owned and drove a 1997 Dodge Dakota jet pickup truck powered by a Westinghouse J-34 engine. 250 mph known top speed.  Click here to see video footage taken at Shakespeare Raceway in 2011.


Ram Jet

1998-ca. 2008

Noel and Suzette Smith, of Loughman, Florida, owned a 1998 Dodge Ram pickup powered by a Pratt & Whitney J-60 engine. Paul Steadman was the principal driver. 205 mph known top speed. Click here to see video footage of the jet truck; go to 0:30 second mark to see the jet pickup.


Queen of Diamonds

1998-2006

Al Hanna selected 22-year-old Jessica Willard, of Leominster, Pennsylvania, to pilot his jet dragster. The car was sponsored by the bicycle division of the U.S. Playing Card Company. In 2003, 20-year-old Jessie Harris, of Rome, New York, started driving the jet dragster while Willard drove the "Eastern Raider" jet dragster for Hanna. From about 2009-14, Jill Canuso was the car's pilot. In about 2016, Sarah Edwards began driving the "Queen of Diamonds II" jet dragster. Click here to see an interview with Jessie Harris in 2007.  Click here to see an interview with Jill Canuso in 2014.  Click here to see an interview with Sarah Edwards in 2018.


Chariot of Fire/The Terminator

1998-ca. 2014

Lou Brookman, of Richfield Springs, New York, debuted this jet dragster in about 1998. 298 mph top speed. In 2000, Lou Pereira, of Canada, drove the dragster for Brookman for a year, and then bought the dragster from him in 2001. In 2003, Pereira changed the name of the dragster to "The Terminator." Click here to see video footage.


Heat Wave

1998-99

A jet-engined Kenworth made exhibition runs in England. More research is needed.


Dragon Hunter

1998-2001

Dwaine and Sharon Starr, from St. Ignace, Michigan, campaigned a 1991 Chevy Beretta jet funny car powered by a Pratt & Whitney J-60 engine. 255 mph known top speed.


Southern Flame

1998-2001

Jon Simmons campaigned a 1998 Chevy S-10 pickup powered by a General Electric J-85 engine.


Runnin with the Devil

1999-2002

Ernie Bogue, of Oakdale, Connecticut, campaigned a 1994 Chevy Lumina powered by a General Electric J-85 engine. Ernie crashed this car in its fourth year of competition. 276 mph known top speed.


School Time

1999-2016+

George Hedebeck and Jerry Segal built a jet-engined 1938 school bus with a Westinghouse J-34 engine for Bob Vance. Jerry Segal drove it.  220 mph known top speed. Click here to see video footage of the jet-engined school bus.


Volcano

2000-2018

Chuck Haynes, of Billings, Montana, campaigned a jet dragster using a Pratt & Whitney J-60 jet engine. 318 mph known top speed. Click here to see video footage of Haynes getting strapped into the jet dragster preparatory to making a run.


Repco Canned Heat

2000-2007+

Paul McRitchie, of Whyalla, Australia, built a jet funny car using an '87 Olds Firenza powered by a Rolls Royce engine.  Click here to see McRitchie giving a demonstration of the fire power of the funny car.


Cargo Mate

2000

Kevin Sindel owned and drove a 1988 Ford Tempo jet funny car.


Under Pressure

2000-ca. 2007?

Pat Davidson, of Upton, Massachusetts, mounted a General Electric J-79 engine in an ambulance. 205 mph known top speed. Click here to see video footage of the jet ambulance.


Rubber City Bomber

2000

Jack Dustman was killed on June 3, 2000, at the Grand Bend Motorplex in Ontario, Canada, while driving a relatively-new jet dragster built by the Dustman brothers. It was powered by a Pratt & Whitney J-60 engine. 


Firestorm

2000-2018+

Roger Goring, of Rotherham, Yorkshire, England, had a 2000 Pontiac Firebird jet funny car prepared with a General Electric J-85 engine. 254 mph known top speed. The current car (2018) is a Mustang with a General Electric J-85-5 engine.  Click here to see "Firestorm" at York Raceway in 2008.


Rollin' Thunder

2000-2002

Brad Janishewski, of Drayton Valley, Alberta, Canada, built a jet funny car with a 2000 Chevrolet Monte Carlo body, powered by a Westinghouse J-34 engine. In 2003, he began campaigning a Honda Civic jet funny car. Click here to see video footage.


Blast from the Past

2000-2003

Ernie Bogue owned and drove a '57 Chevy powered by a General Electric J-85 engine. 280 mph known top speed.


Port-O-Jet

2000-2010

Paul "Hot Rod" Stender, of Big Bend, Wisconsin, built and "drove" a jet-powered outhouse. In attempting to set a "world's record" at Lowe's Motor Speedway in 2005, his record attempt came to a screeching halt when he turned over while attempting to negotiate the first turn. He had built two of the crowd-pleasing potties. In a 2007 interview, Stender said, "The next one I build is gonna have a bigger engine. We're hoping to top 100 mph, but at the same time we have to be able to stay on the ground. It isn't really safe. It's not real aerodynamic. I rolled it once--crashed and flipped it. It hurts. You get slammed around. I wear a helmet and a full fire-resistant uniform. It would make a big boom if it blew up because of the propane and jet fuel. I used to have a roll of toilet paper near the urinal but it kept getting sucked into the engine." 71 mph known top speed. Click here to see video footage of the jet-powered Port-A-Potty and a brief interview with Stender.